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A lounge chair inspired by a wheelbarrow! 
http://design-milk.com/rapide-lounge-chair-inspired-wheelbarrow/

A lounge chair inspired by a wheelbarrow! 

http://design-milk.com/rapide-lounge-chair-inspired-wheelbarrow/

MOVIE industry approaches you can use to re-energize your business.
http://www.inc.com/neil-parmar/5-business-reinvention-secrets-from-the-movie-industry.html

MOVIE industry approaches you can use to re-energize your business.

http://www.inc.com/neil-parmar/5-business-reinvention-secrets-from-the-movie-industry.html

Having some fun with our CROSS POLLINATION process. 

BIGHEADS - CROSS POLLINATION (VIDEO)

Innovation happens when you BORROW ideas, approaches and techniques from OUTSIDE industries and apply them to your own. We call it CROSS POLLINATION.

A furniture line inspired by the way trees grow. http://design-milk.com/furniture-inspired-growth-trees/

A furniture line inspired by the way trees grow. http://design-milk.com/furniture-inspired-growth-trees/

An all-in-one measuring spoon inspired by the art of ORIGAMI. 
http://designtaxi.com/news/368174/An-Innovative-All-In-One-Origami-Measuring-Spoon-That-Is-Flexible-Stylish/

An all-in-one measuring spoon inspired by the art of ORIGAMI. 

http://designtaxi.com/news/368174/An-Innovative-All-In-One-Origami-Measuring-Spoon-That-Is-Flexible-Stylish/

Speedo’s new swimming fins borrow their design from humpback whales.http://gizmodo.com/speedos-crazy-nemesis-fins-borrow-their-design-from-hum-1618156563. 
Just another example of using “Cross Pollination” to inspire product design.

Speedo’s new swimming fins borrow their design from humpback whales.http://gizmodo.com/speedos-crazy-nemesis-fins-borrow-their-design-from-hum-1618156563.

Just another example of using “Cross Pollination” to inspire product design.

Aug 9
This ORIGAMI-inspired bag expands and contracts to meet your needs. Just another great example of borrowing an approach from an unexpected source to inspire an amazing design (what we call “Cross Pollination”)
http://design-milk.com/transfold-backpack-bag-expands-contracts/

This ORIGAMI-inspired bag expands and contracts to meet your needs. Just another great example of borrowing an approach from an unexpected source to inspire an amazing design (what we call “Cross Pollination”)

http://design-milk.com/transfold-backpack-bag-expands-contracts/

REINVENTING THE (BORING) PAPER RECEIPT
HERE is an article from Fast Company about ways to reinvent the boring, old paper receipt.
We would then be able to add in the people we were with, stories, anecdotes, etc. so we end up with a killer visual journal. 
What would you do? 

REINVENTING THE (BORING) PAPER RECEIPT

HERE is an article from Fast Company about ways to reinvent the boring, old paper receipt.

We would then be able to add in the people we were with, stories, anecdotes, etc. so we end up with a killer visual journal.

What would you do? 

Looking for a Job (or a New Hire)…Consider CROSS POLLINATION
When it comes to creating new products and disruptive ideas, we find “cross pollination” to be one of our most powerful tools. That’s where we help our clients solve their most pressing problems by borrowing (okay, stealing) approaches and tactics from completely unexpected industries and interests.  For example, we recently helped a credit card company develop a unique loyalty program based on tactics used by a rock band with a huge (loyal) following.  
Of course, the practice of cross pollination can be applied to almost anything…even a job search. We recently had a company event and inevitably struck up a conversation with the bartender who was slinging the drinks. He was a young, clever guy who had graduated from college back in December and was actively looking for a job in the marketing industry (we tried to talk him out of it, but he wouldn’t listen - hah!).
Anyway, we had him send us his resume and we promised to be on the lookout for any potential opportunities that we might hear about among our marketing pals. Interestingly, when we received his resume, we noticed that his current bartending job wasn’t mentioned and we wanted to know why.  
When we called to ask him, he explained that he felt his bar gig wouldn’t “look right” on his resume or help get him the marketing job he wanted. That’s when we explained to him that he needed to look at it DIFFERENTLY and use his bar experience to his advantage. And we did that by using cross pollination principles where we took his bartending skills and matched them up with the marketing industry.
Marketing is all about understanding consumer behavior…and no one knows how to read behavior better than a bartender!  
Marketing is all about convincing people to try new things (or old things)…and no one gets you to do that more than a bartender!
The more we spoke…the more connections we made…and the more convinced he became that he not only needed to add his bartending experience to his resume (and LinkedIn profile), but he needed to really play it up during his interviews.
Of course, it can work the other way around as well. If you’re a HR manager, you could be making these types of connections and find employees who you may never have considered for a position you’re trying to fill. For example, say you’re looking for a new business development person with a thick skin (who can deal with constant rejection). Well, you might want to interview some people with acting experience or artists, since they are constantly selling/pitching themselves and know how to handle rejection better than anyone!
So, if you’re out there looking for new job (or even changing careers)…and you think your current experience isn’t relevant or helpful, you might want to give some thought to those unexpected connections between what you’re doing and what you want to do…and USE them to your advantage (instead of trying to hide them)!

Looking for a Job (or a New Hire)…Consider CROSS POLLINATION

When it comes to creating new products and disruptive ideas, we find “cross pollination” to be one of our most powerful tools. That’s where we help our clients solve their most pressing problems by borrowing (okay, stealing) approaches and tactics from completely unexpected industries and interests.  For example, we recently helped a credit card company develop a unique loyalty program based on tactics used by a rock band with a huge (loyal) following.  

Of course, the practice of cross pollination can be applied to almost anything…even a job search. We recently had a company event and inevitably struck up a conversation with the bartender who was slinging the drinks. He was a young, clever guy who had graduated from college back in December and was actively looking for a job in the marketing industry (we tried to talk him out of it, but he wouldn’t listen - hah!).

Anyway, we had him send us his resume and we promised to be on the lookout for any potential opportunities that we might hear about among our marketing pals. Interestingly, when we received his resume, we noticed that his current bartending job wasn’t mentioned and we wanted to know why.  

When we called to ask him, he explained that he felt his bar gig wouldn’t “look right” on his resume or help get him the marketing job he wanted. That’s when we explained to him that he needed to look at it DIFFERENTLY and use his bar experience to his advantage. And we did that by using cross pollination principles where we took his bartending skills and matched them up with the marketing industry.

Marketing is all about understanding consumer behavior…and no one knows how to read behavior better than a bartender!  

Marketing is all about convincing people to try new things (or old things)…and no one gets you to do that more than a bartender!

The more we spoke…the more connections we made…and the more convinced he became that he not only needed to add his bartending experience to his resume (and LinkedIn profile), but he needed to really play it up during his interviews.

Of course, it can work the other way around as well. If you’re a HR manager, you could be making these types of connections and find employees who you may never have considered for a position you’re trying to fill. For example, say you’re looking for a new business development person with a thick skin (who can deal with constant rejection). Well, you might want to interview some people with acting experience or artists, since they are constantly selling/pitching themselves and know how to handle rejection better than anyone!

So, if you’re out there looking for new job (or even changing careers)…and you think your current experience isn’t relevant or helpful, you might want to give some thought to those unexpected connections between what you’re doing and what you want to do…and USE them to your advantage (instead of trying to hide them)!