BigHeads Network

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We’ve finally found our new home base in NYC! Starting in January we can be found (some of the time) at the inspiring and beautiful NEUEHOUSE co-working space!

NeueHouse website

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The AGE when people are the MOST CREATIVE
http://www.fastcompany.com/3023045/leadership-now/at-what-age-are-people-the-most-creative

The AGE when people are the MOST CREATIVE

http://www.fastcompany.com/3023045/leadership-now/at-what-age-are-people-the-most-creative

Dec 9
"Thought diversity" is what BigHeads is all about…and it’s exciting to see the concept finally starting to catch on!!!
http://www.businessinsider.com/the-future-of-workplace-diversity-is-here-2013-9

"Thought diversity" is what BigHeads is all about…and it’s exciting to see the concept finally starting to catch on!!!

http://www.businessinsider.com/the-future-of-workplace-diversity-is-here-2013-9

Dec 6
What a DATING COACH can teach your small business about NETWORKING (by BigHeads founder, John Palumbo)
Entrepreneurs know that networking can attract new customers, clients, and investors. And while there are countless services, books, and blogs that teach professional networking tips, the tactics from a different sort of networking just might prove even more successful. David Wygant is a Los Angeles-based dating and relationship expert with 20 years of experience who helps singles find their perfect match, using approaches and techniques that can often be applied to your business, helping you to network smarter.
EVERYDAY LIFE WILL DELIVER WHO YOU WANT TO MEET
When it comes to relationships, one of the biggest mistakes singles make in their quest to find their perfect match is going to places where they think they will meet someone, such as bars, singles events, and dating websites. Wygant urges his clients to avoid them all. “Singles go to those places with an agenda,” he says. “And when you have an agenda, you have expectations. When you have expectations, you’re not being yourself. Ultimately, it falls apart right there and nothing comes of it.”
His advice? Meet people where you’re most comfortable, when you’re doing what you enjoy. “I tell my clients who are interested in art to visit galleries and those who are interested in organic food to visit the local farmer’s market,” he says. This way, they are enjoying themselves without any agenda or expectations. Most importantly, they are interested in their surroundings, leading to authentic conversations. “Those are the times when they are comfortable and talking openly and intelligently about a topic. So, when they see someone they’re interested in, they’re not tongue-tied and the conversations aren’t forced and fake like they are in those other places,” he contends.
The Lesson: Business owners have been programmed to believe that there are certain places you must go to network and attract new customers, including industry conferences or networking events. The problem is, everyone in attendance is circling one another like sharks. Everyone has an agenda, and worst of all, everyone sounds like a cheesy salesperson.
So consider Wygant’s approach and forgo that next industry networking event. Instead, visit places you actually enjoy going, where you’ll initiate and hold authentic conversations. Some of those conversations just might turn to the topic of business (“So what do you do for a living?”) and lead to contacts and introductions that will benefit your company. Perhaps not as target-rich an environment as a trade show, but the connections you do wind up making will be that much stronger and more authentic.
BREAK THE ICE BY BEING INQUISITIVE - LIKE CHILDREN DO
“When a child sees something they like—a bracelet or sunglasses—they just blurt it out and let you know it,” Wygant explains. “That’s why I encourage my clients to act like a kid again. If someone is wearing an interesting piece of jewelry, tell them how cool it is. Or if they’re using that new Apple gadget you’re thinking about buying, ask them if it lives up to all the hype.”
According to Wygant, an inquisitive exchange is one of the most powerful ways to break the ice because it’s impulsive and even somewhat innocent, which most people find refreshing, non-threatening, and endearing.
As part of his suggested dating regimen, Wygant encourages his clients to practice these types of exchanges with everyone they encounter. This way the behavior becomes second nature and not a forced effort they only use when they spot someone who sparks their romantic interest.
The Lesson: When you’re at a meeting or even viewing profiles of potential contacts or customers on professional networking sites, take Wygant’s advice and act like a kid again. If you come across a detail that jumps out at you (no matter how small), don’t hesitate to start a conversation around that topic. 
For example, you might want to introduce yourself to someone on LinkedIn and notice that they’ve listed a personal hobby or interest that you also share. That’s something you could mention in your private introduction message, which would surely be more memorable than the typical introduction messages they receive.  Plus, they’ll probably do something they rarely do—hit the “reply” button and write back.
THE FANTASY NEVER LIVES UP TO REALITY
According to Wygant, many singles become attracted to someone based on their physical appearance or their online profile, and that’s when their imagination takes over. “People see someone or read a profile on a dating site and they begin to fill in the blanks and create this fantasy person before they ever meet,” Wygant says.
Inevitably, this practice leads to disappointment because these people ultimately don’t live up to the fantasy.
In order to help his clients avoid this situation, Wygant trains them to catch themselves when they start creating fantasy versions of people and consciously remind themselves that the person they’re about to create is an illusion and may be no better or worse than anyone else.
The Lesson: Creating a fantasy isn’t exclusive to dating. Many business owners and entrepreneurs have a wishlist of people they’d like to meet and customers they’d like to acquire. Just like the singles, they build up a fantasy situation. Of course, if they don’t get a response, find that the person isn’t interested, or lose that new business pitch, they end up discouraged and unmotivated.
Take a lesson from Wygant and learn to catch yourself as you start to turn that customer into the perfect (fantasy) client. Remind yourself that while having that client’s name on your roster might seem like a dream come true, no client relationship is ever perfect. There are always unforeseen obstacles and challenges that might make you wish you never met the person in the first place.
It’s a simple and effective way to keep things in perspective so you don’t find yourself getting unnecessarily disappointed.

So the next time you’re getting set to sign up for that business networking event or you’re on the prowl for new customers, remember that networking isn’t so different from dating and consider taking David Wygant’s advice to… heart.

(originally published on AmEx OPENforum.com)

What a DATING COACH can teach your small business about NETWORKING (by BigHeads founder, John Palumbo)

Entrepreneurs know that networking can attract new customers, clients, and investors. And while there are countless services, books, and blogs that teach professional networking tips, the tactics from a different sort of networking just might prove even more successful. David Wygant is a Los Angeles-based dating and relationship expert with 20 years of experience who helps singles find their perfect match, using approaches and techniques that can often be applied to your business, helping you to network smarter.

EVERYDAY LIFE WILL DELIVER WHO YOU WANT TO MEET

When it comes to relationships, one of the biggest mistakes singles make in their quest to find their perfect match is going to places where they think they will meet someone, such as bars, singles events, and dating websites. Wygant urges his clients to avoid them all. “Singles go to those places with an agenda,” he says. “And when you have an agenda, you have expectations. When you have expectations, you’re not being yourself. Ultimately, it falls apart right there and nothing comes of it.”

His advice? Meet people where you’re most comfortable, when you’re doing what you enjoy. “I tell my clients who are interested in art to visit galleries and those who are interested in organic food to visit the local farmer’s market,” he says. This way, they are enjoying themselves without any agenda or expectations. Most importantly, they are interested in their surroundings, leading to authentic conversations. “Those are the times when they are comfortable and talking openly and intelligently about a topic. So, when they see someone they’re interested in, they’re not tongue-tied and the conversations aren’t forced and fake like they are in those other places,” he contends.

The Lesson: Business owners have been programmed to believe that there are certain places you must go to network and attract new customers, including industry conferences or networking events. The problem is, everyone in attendance is circling one another like sharks. Everyone has an agenda, and worst of all, everyone sounds like a cheesy salesperson.

So consider Wygant’s approach and forgo that next industry networking event. Instead, visit places you actually enjoy going, where you’ll initiate and hold authentic conversations. Some of those conversations just might turn to the topic of business (“So what do you do for a living?”) and lead to contacts and introductions that will benefit your company. Perhaps not as target-rich an environment as a trade show, but the connections you do wind up making will be that much stronger and more authentic.

BREAK THE ICE BY BEING INQUISITIVE - LIKE CHILDREN DO

“When a child sees something they like—a bracelet or sunglasses—they just blurt it out and let you know it,” Wygant explains. “That’s why I encourage my clients to act like a kid again. If someone is wearing an interesting piece of jewelry, tell them how cool it is. Or if they’re using that new Apple gadget you’re thinking about buying, ask them if it lives up to all the hype.”

According to Wygant, an inquisitive exchange is one of the most powerful ways to break the ice because it’s impulsive and even somewhat innocent, which most people find refreshing, non-threatening, and endearing.

As part of his suggested dating regimen, Wygant encourages his clients to practice these types of exchanges with everyone they encounter. This way the behavior becomes second nature and not a forced effort they only use when they spot someone who sparks their romantic interest.

The Lesson: When you’re at a meeting or even viewing profiles of potential contacts or customers on professional networking sites, take Wygant’s advice and act like a kid again. If you come across a detail that jumps out at you (no matter how small), don’t hesitate to start a conversation around that topic. 

For example, you might want to introduce yourself to someone on LinkedIn and notice that they’ve listed a personal hobby or interest that you also share. That’s something you could mention in your private introduction message, which would surely be more memorable than the typical introduction messages they receive.  Plus, they’ll probably do something they rarely do—hit the “reply” button and write back.

THE FANTASY NEVER LIVES UP TO REALITY

According to Wygant, many singles become attracted to someone based on their physical appearance or their online profile, and that’s when their imagination takes over. “People see someone or read a profile on a dating site and they begin to fill in the blanks and create this fantasy person before they ever meet,” Wygant says.

Inevitably, this practice leads to disappointment because these people ultimately don’t live up to the fantasy.

In order to help his clients avoid this situation, Wygant trains them to catch themselves when they start creating fantasy versions of people and consciously remind themselves that the person they’re about to create is an illusion and may be no better or worse than anyone else.

The Lesson: Creating a fantasy isn’t exclusive to dating. Many business owners and entrepreneurs have a wishlist of people they’d like to meet and customers they’d like to acquire. Just like the singles, they build up a fantasy situation. Of course, if they don’t get a response, find that the person isn’t interested, or lose that new business pitch, they end up discouraged and unmotivated.

Take a lesson from Wygant and learn to catch yourself as you start to turn that customer into the perfect (fantasy) client. Remind yourself that while having that client’s name on your roster might seem like a dream come true, no client relationship is ever perfect. There are always unforeseen obstacles and challenges that might make you wish you never met the person in the first place.

It’s a simple and effective way to keep things in perspective so you don’t find yourself getting unnecessarily disappointed.

So the next time you’re getting set to sign up for that business networking event or you’re on the prowl for new customers, remember that networking isn’t so different from dating and consider taking David Wygant’s advice to… heart.

(originally published on AmEx OPENforum.com)

Dec 4
What a BOUNTY HUNTER can teach your small business about FINDING THE BEST HIRES (by BigHeads founder, John Palumbo)
When it comes to locating and hiring the best employees, few small businesses have access to the big bag of tricks that larger companies do. While job sites and social networks have helped to level the playing field, the fact is that some of the best talent needs to be proactively hunted down, because they are neither out there actively looking for a job, nor are they interested in being found.
Knowing this, I decided to speak to someone who knows a thing or two about hunting down tough-to-find people—renowned bounty hunter (and BigHead) Scott Bernstein. The tactics, tools, and techniques he uses to find fugitives may just help your small business find the right employees.
ESTABLISH A PROFILE
One of the first things Bernstein does when he receives the—often limited—information about a fugitive from the authorities or bail bondsman is to establish a profile. Using his experience and his behavioral expertise, along with some creativity, he tries to put himself into the mindset of the accused. “Let’s say I know you were a drug dealer who lived in a certain area,” Bernstein says. “Right off the bat, that arms me with a wealth of information. For example, I would know you would be out on the street between the hours of 9 at night and 5 in the morning selling drugs.” Ultimately, using this type of role playing exercise allows him to get a better sense of what moves his fugitives might make and the places where he might ultimately find them.
The Lesson:Get in the mindset of the ideal candidate you are looking for. Consider such things as the places they might go during their free time, the hobbies they might be interested in, the websites they might visit, the way they commute to their current job, or where they might have that cocktail after a long day.
Then use that information to your advantage. Post your job listing in those (unorthodox) places and on those websites. Even visit some of those locations and meet the people face-to-face. While this might seem time-consuming at first, once you find the locations that yield the best talent, you will have uncovered a fertile recruiting ground that you can use for future searches and save yourself time.
EXTEND YOUR TEAM
When fugitives are “in the wind” (unable to be found), a bounty hunter needs as many people out there trying to locate them as possible. In some cases, that includes relying on the help of people who intimately know the landscape where the bounty hunter believes the fugitives he seeks might be hiding. “I will approach bouncers and bartenders at local bars or front-desk clerks and cleaning people at local motels and give them a little something to keep their eyes and ears open and call me with any information,” Bernstein says.
The Lesson: By taking a page out of a bounty hunter’s playbook, you can expand your recruiting team even further than your own networks. Zero in on specific regions and identify those places, venues, and businesses where the staff gets to know their patrons, guests, and clientele, such as daycare centers, local watering holes, salons, and health clubs. Then enlist people who work at those places, provide them with a description of the type of person you are looking for, and ask them to act as extra sets of eyes and ears to help you identify potential candidates. You can even offer a small finder’s fee or gift if their information leads to a future hire. And if you’re questioning the caliber of information these people could provide, just think about the amount of information your hairstylist, favorite bartender or personal trainer knows about you.
FIND THE “JUDAS”
When a bounty hunter begins a search, one of the first things he or she will do is try to identify the “Judas”—that one person the accused has confided in who has valuable information about his or her whereabouts. Once they find the Judas, the bounty hunter will get in contact with that person and ask seemingly innocent questions that will provide them with the information they need.
Now, what you need to understand is that this is done in a somewhat deceptive manner. For example, a bounty hunter might contact a parent or significant other under the guise of anyone from a package delivery person to an old friend from high school to put that potential Judas at ease and have them open up.
The Lesson:It’s one thing to find employees, but it’s another thing to evaluate and vet them and make sure they are the right person for the job you have available. Interestingly, the “Judas” approach above could come in handy in those instances, without having to go undercover, of course.
Consider this: when you have identified a potential candidate, their Judas is already sitting right in front of you in the area on their resume that says, “References upon request.” Let’s face it, references are usually the people who will provide you with a glowing report about the candidate. However, you could take a lesson from a bounty hunter and ask seemingly innocent questions that are designed to give you much more information than the reference realizes.
For example, your organization might be very lean and require someone who is a self-starter who doesn’t need a lot of hand-holding. When you’re speaking to the reference, you could ask a question such as, “What kind of environment do you think she is best suited for? One that’s very hands-on where she will receive a lot of direction, or one that’s more entrepreneurial where she can jump in and figure things out on her own?” If the answer doesn’t match your culture, you know the candidate is not the right fit.

As you can see, when it comes to finding employees you don’t need to have a fully-staffed HR department or retain an expensive executive recruiter. Instead, you can take some cues from a bounty hunter and apply those tactics and techniques to quickly and effectively hunt down great talent. Happy hunting!

(Originally published on AmEx OPENFORUM.COM)

What a BOUNTY HUNTER can teach your small business about FINDING THE BEST HIRES (by BigHeads founder, John Palumbo)

When it comes to locating and hiring the best employees, few small businesses have access to the big bag of tricks that larger companies do. While job sites and social networks have helped to level the playing field, the fact is that some of the best talent needs to be proactively hunted down, because they are neither out there actively looking for a job, nor are they interested in being found.

Knowing this, I decided to speak to someone who knows a thing or two about hunting down tough-to-find people—renowned bounty hunter (and BigHead) Scott Bernstein. The tactics, tools, and techniques he uses to find fugitives may just help your small business find the right employees.

ESTABLISH A PROFILE

One of the first things Bernstein does when he receives the—often limited—information about a fugitive from the authorities or bail bondsman is to establish a profile. Using his experience and his behavioral expertise, along with some creativity, he tries to put himself into the mindset of the accused. “Let’s say I know you were a drug dealer who lived in a certain area,” Bernstein says. “Right off the bat, that arms me with a wealth of information. For example, I would know you would be out on the street between the hours of 9 at night and 5 in the morning selling drugs.” Ultimately, using this type of role playing exercise allows him to get a better sense of what moves his fugitives might make and the places where he might ultimately find them.

The Lesson:Get in the mindset of the ideal candidate you are looking for. Consider such things as the places they might go during their free time, the hobbies they might be interested in, the websites they might visit, the way they commute to their current job, or where they might have that cocktail after a long day.

Then use that information to your advantage. Post your job listing in those (unorthodox) places and on those websites. Even visit some of those locations and meet the people face-to-face. While this might seem time-consuming at first, once you find the locations that yield the best talent, you will have uncovered a fertile recruiting ground that you can use for future searches and save yourself time.

EXTEND YOUR TEAM

When fugitives are “in the wind” (unable to be found), a bounty hunter needs as many people out there trying to locate them as possible. In some cases, that includes relying on the help of people who intimately know the landscape where the bounty hunter believes the fugitives he seeks might be hiding. “I will approach bouncers and bartenders at local bars or front-desk clerks and cleaning people at local motels and give them a little something to keep their eyes and ears open and call me with any information,” Bernstein says.

The Lesson: By taking a page out of a bounty hunter’s playbook, you can expand your recruiting team even further than your own networks. Zero in on specific regions and identify those places, venues, and businesses where the staff gets to know their patrons, guests, and clientele, such as daycare centers, local watering holes, salons, and health clubs. Then enlist people who work at those places, provide them with a description of the type of person you are looking for, and ask them to act as extra sets of eyes and ears to help you identify potential candidates. You can even offer a small finder’s fee or gift if their information leads to a future hire. And if you’re questioning the caliber of information these people could provide, just think about the amount of information your hairstylist, favorite bartender or personal trainer knows about you.

FIND THE “JUDAS”

When a bounty hunter begins a search, one of the first things he or she will do is try to identify the “Judas”—that one person the accused has confided in who has valuable information about his or her whereabouts. Once they find the Judas, the bounty hunter will get in contact with that person and ask seemingly innocent questions that will provide them with the information they need.

Now, what you need to understand is that this is done in a somewhat deceptive manner. For example, a bounty hunter might contact a parent or significant other under the guise of anyone from a package delivery person to an old friend from high school to put that potential Judas at ease and have them open up.

The Lesson:It’s one thing to find employees, but it’s another thing to evaluate and vet them and make sure they are the right person for the job you have available. Interestingly, the “Judas” approach above could come in handy in those instances, without having to go undercover, of course.

Consider this: when you have identified a potential candidate, their Judas is already sitting right in front of you in the area on their resume that says, “References upon request.” Let’s face it, references are usually the people who will provide you with a glowing report about the candidate. However, you could take a lesson from a bounty hunter and ask seemingly innocent questions that are designed to give you much more information than the reference realizes.

For example, your organization might be very lean and require someone who is a self-starter who doesn’t need a lot of hand-holding. When you’re speaking to the reference, you could ask a question such as, “What kind of environment do you think she is best suited for? One that’s very hands-on where she will receive a lot of direction, or one that’s more entrepreneurial where she can jump in and figure things out on her own?” If the answer doesn’t match your culture, you know the candidate is not the right fit.

As you can see, when it comes to finding employees you don’t need to have a fully-staffed HR department or retain an expensive executive recruiter. Instead, you can take some cues from a bounty hunter and apply those tactics and techniques to quickly and effectively hunt down great talent. Happy hunting!

(Originally published on AmEx OPENFORUM.COM)

CANCEL THE BRAINSTORM!  You Can’t Schedule Creativity.
Some people will tell you their best ideas hit them when they’re in the shower…while others are most inspired when they’re watching their kids…while others can’t pinpoint exactly when or where inspiration most often strikes them.
Yet, when the time comes to innovate…brands, companies and agencies will send out an email and invite (“order”) people to the conference room, where they are expected to be “on” and create BIG ideas.  
You simply can’t order some pizzas…toss a bunch of magazines on a conference room table along with cans of Play-Doh and tell people to “BE CREATIVE” from 1pm-2pm.  
Creativity cannot be SCHEDULED or FORCED upon someone.
Sure, you can say that some companies do this to drive collaboration or to make people feel like they are part of the process, but that approach is flawed. People see right through that bullshit…and it ends up hurting more than helping, because they know it’s some ploy to drive morale and has nothing to do with getting their best thinking and ideas.
Let people create on their own schedule…using their personal (and proven) problem-solving techniques…and watch what happens!

CANCEL THE BRAINSTORM!  You Can’t Schedule Creativity.

Some people will tell you their best ideas hit them when they’re in the shower…while others are most inspired when they’re watching their kids…while others can’t pinpoint exactly when or where inspiration most often strikes them.

Yet, when the time comes to innovate…brands, companies and agencies will send out an email and invite (“order”) people to the conference room, where they are expected to be “on” and create BIG ideas.  

You simply can’t order some pizzas…toss a bunch of magazines on a conference room table along with cans of Play-Doh and tell people to “BE CREATIVE” from 1pm-2pm.  

Creativity cannot be SCHEDULED or FORCED upon someone.

Sure, you can say that some companies do this to drive collaboration or to make people feel like they are part of the process, but that approach is flawed. People see right through that bullshit…and it ends up hurting more than helping, because they know it’s some ploy to drive morale and has nothing to do with getting their best thinking and ideas.

Let people create on their own schedule…using their personal (and proven) problem-solving techniques…and watch what happens!

1983 - Bill Gates unveils WINDOWS
http://gizmodo.com/bill-gates-unveiled-windows-30-years-ago-today-1461813702

1983 - Bill Gates unveils WINDOWS

http://gizmodo.com/bill-gates-unveiled-windows-30-years-ago-today-1461813702

Stop thinking your industry challenges are so unique that you can’t benefit from OPEN INNOVATION. Take a cue from these people in the HEALTH CARE industry, who are finding unique ways to solve problems using OUTSIDE THINKING. If they can do it…you can too!!! 
http://blogs.hbr.org/2013/10/bringing-outside-innovations-into-health-care/
 

Stop thinking your industry challenges are so unique that you can’t benefit from OPEN INNOVATION. Take a cue from these people in the HEALTH CARE industry, who are finding unique ways to solve problems using OUTSIDE THINKING. If they can do it…you can too!!! 

http://blogs.hbr.org/2013/10/bringing-outside-innovations-into-health-care/

 

Nov 7
The Minivan - 1983
On November 2nd, 1983, the world’s first minivan rolled off of Chrysler’s assembly line. It was the vehicle that saved Chrysler from financial doom — and in the process, shaped the automotive landscape for thirty years to come. 
http://gizmodo.com/30-years-ago-today-chrylser-invented-the-minivan-and-1457451986

The Minivan - 1983

On November 2nd, 1983, the world’s first minivan rolled off of Chrysler’s assembly line. It was the vehicle that saved Chrysler from financial doom — and in the process, shaped the automotive landscape for thirty years to come. 

http://gizmodo.com/30-years-ago-today-chrylser-invented-the-minivan-and-1457451986

The Two Words EVERYONE In Los Angeles says - LET’S COLLABORATE!
As we wrap-up our latest visit to Los Angeles…there’s one thing we’ve noticed that makes us love this place even more than we already did — people love to collaborate!
Now it might be because the entertainment industry is all about collaboration and it has seeped into the overall DNA of the city…but no matter who we meet - from entrepreneurs…to talent managers…to attorneys…to charities - at some point in the conversation they will say, “Let’s collaborate.”
Hell, in other places people keep things close to the vest and would rather compete than collaborate.  Seriously, think about the last time you met someone who said, "We should do some work together" and REALLY meant it.  You probably can’t even remember it.
I guess we could toss out something cheesy like, "You can’t spell collaboration without LA" but we’d never do that. Hah.
We love you LA…and we’ll be back shortly.  Let the collaboration begin!!!

The Two Words EVERYONE In Los Angeles says - LET’S COLLABORATE!

As we wrap-up our latest visit to Los Angeles…there’s one thing we’ve noticed that makes us love this place even more than we already did — people love to collaborate!

Now it might be because the entertainment industry is all about collaboration and it has seeped into the overall DNA of the city…but no matter who we meet - from entrepreneurs…to talent managers…to attorneys…to charities - at some point in the conversation they will say, “Let’s collaborate.”

Hell, in other places people keep things close to the vest and would rather compete than collaborate.  Seriously, think about the last time you met someone who said, "We should do some work together" and REALLY meant it.  You probably can’t even remember it.

I guess we could toss out something cheesy like, "You can’t spell collaboration without LA" but we’d never do that. Hah.

We love you LA…and we’ll be back shortly.  Let the collaboration begin!!!